Journal of Pathology Informatics

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 37-

On the edge of a digital pathology transformation: Views from a cellular pathology laboratory focus group


Casmir Turnquist1, Sharon Roberts-Gant2, Helen Hemsworth2, Kieron White2, Lisa Browning2, Gabrielle Rees2, Derek Roskell2, Clare Verrill3 
1 University of Oxford Medical School, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
2 Department of Cellular Pathology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK
3 Department of Cellular Pathology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Casmir Turnquist
University of Oxford Medical School, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9DU
UK

Introduction: Digital pathology has the potential to revolutionize the way clinical diagnoses are made while improving safety and quality. With a few notable exceptions in the UK, few National Health Service (NHS) departments have deployed digital pathology platforms. Thus, in the next few years, many departments are anticipated to undergo the transition to digital pathology. In this period of transition, capturing attitudes and experiences can elucidate issues to be addressed and foster collaboration between NHS Trusts. This study aims to qualitatively ascertain the benefits and challenges of transitioning to digital pathology from the perspectives of pathologists and biomedical scientists in a department about to undergo the transition from diagnostic reporting via traditional microscopy to digital pathology. Methods:A focus group discussion was held in the setting of a large NHS teaching hospital's cellular pathology department which was on the brink of transitioning to digital pathology. A set of open questions were developed and posed to a group of pathologists and biomedical scientists in a focus group setting. Notes of the discussion were made along with an audio recording with permission. The discussion was subsequently turned into a series of topic headings and analyzed using content analysis. Results:Identified benefits of digital pathology included enhanced collaboration, teaching, cost savings, research, growth of specialty, multidisciplinary teams, and patient-centered care. Barriers to transitioning to digital pathology included standardization, validation, national implementation, storage and backups, training, logistical implementation, cost-effectiveness, privacy, and legality. Conclusion:Many benefits of digital pathology were identified, but key barriers need to be addressed in order to fully implement digital pathology on a trust and national level.


How to cite this article:
Turnquist C, Roberts-Gant S, Hemsworth H, White K, Browning L, Rees G, Roskell D, Verrill C. On the edge of a digital pathology transformation: Views from a cellular pathology laboratory focus group.J Pathol Inform 2019;10:37-37


How to cite this URL:
Turnquist C, Roberts-Gant S, Hemsworth H, White K, Browning L, Rees G, Roskell D, Verrill C. On the edge of a digital pathology transformation: Views from a cellular pathology laboratory focus group. J Pathol Inform [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Sep 22 ];10:37-37
Available from: http://www.jpathinformatics.org/article.asp?issn=2153-3539;year=2019;volume=10;issue=1;spage=37;epage=37;aulast=Turnquist;type=0