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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 3: Breakdown of a complete whole slide image (WSI) into its elemental fragments, using an example of lymph node tissue in a cancer staging case. (a) A complete clinical WSI ideally includes all tissue and the slide label; this is generally as far as current WSI system delve into the WSI. (b) However, if the label is machine-labeled, then the WSI can associate the label data with more extensive anatomic pathology lab information system data, depicted as a cloud. Further, the tissue could be divided into histologic levels or cuts (two cuts are pictured but cuts could be included from multiple slides). The levels are depicted side-by-side, as separate image objects. (c) Although there are many possible approaches, the author would prefer to view multiple tissue levels either as a stack (pictured) or simultaneously (pictured, top level is partially transparent). (d) Subdivision into individual tissue fragments is also possible. Here, the individual lymph node fragments are depicted as separate objects, each one with two levels (stacked). (e) If individual tissue fragments are separate objects, then they can be reviewed independently. The pathologist can focus on the review without having to track the fragments' locations on the original slides, because the computer manages this information

Figure 3: Breakdown of a complete whole slide image (WSI) into its elemental fragments, using an example of lymph node tissue in a cancer staging case. (a) A complete clinical WSI ideally includes all tissue and the slide label; this is generally as far as current WSI system delve into the WSI. (b) However, if the label is machine-labeled, then the WSI can associate the label data with more extensive anatomic pathology lab information system data, depicted as a cloud. Further, the tissue could be divided into histologic levels or cuts (two cuts are pictured but cuts could be included from multiple slides). The levels are depicted side-by-side, as separate image objects. (c) Although there are many possible approaches, the author would prefer to view multiple tissue levels either as a stack (pictured) or simultaneously (pictured, top level is partially transparent). (d) Subdivision into individual tissue fragments is also possible. Here, the individual lymph node fragments are depicted as separate objects, each one with two levels (stacked). (e) If individual tissue fragments are separate objects, then they can be reviewed independently. The pathologist can focus on the review without having to track the fragments' locations on the original slides, because the computer manages this information