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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 7: Three-dimensional printed models used in education. Integration of three-dimensional models into the classroom has resulted in improved safety and appreciation of anatomic relationships. Hazards requisite to tissue handing, such as the handling of formalin and biologic materials, had previously been circumvented at our institution by suspending specimens in clear plastic boxes filled with formalin (as seen on the table in the image). However, this solution was suboptimal, as it limits tactile specimen interaction and therefore appreciation of important anatomic relationship. Utilization of photorealistic three-dimensional models obviates the need for these accommodations, allowing for another step forward in medical education

Figure 7: Three-dimensional printed models used in education. Integration of three-dimensional models into the classroom has resulted in improved safety and appreciation of anatomic relationships. Hazards requisite to tissue handing, such as the handling of formalin and biologic materials, had previously been circumvented at our institution by suspending specimens in clear plastic boxes filled with formalin (as seen on the table in the image). However, this solution was suboptimal, as it limits tactile specimen interaction and therefore appreciation of important anatomic relationship. Utilization of photorealistic three-dimensional models obviates the need for these accommodations, allowing for another step forward in medical education